Fischer makes stop in Lexington

July 25, 2012


LEXINGTON CLIPPER-HERALD
By: Kevin Zelaya

LEXINGTON – In her first visit as the Nebraska Republican nominee for U.S. Senate to Lexington, Deb Fischer focused on how to tackle various troubling issues during a Saturday morning stop at the Heartland Museum of Military Vehicles.

“The thing Nebraskans are most concerned about is the out of control spending in Washington,” which once tackled could lead to progress on the budget deficit and economy, Fischer said.

Fischer said business owners she’s talked to tell her they’d like to hire more workers but are discouraged to do so because of uncertainty regarding healthcare reform, regulations and taxes.

In her talk to the a group of about 40 or 50 Dawson County Republican Party members, Fischer rarely mentioned her opponent in the election, former Democratic Nebraska Senator and Governor Bob Kerrey, but was quick to blast the growing intrusion of government in citizens’ lives.

“Government can’t be everything to every one, we can’t bail out everyone,” Fischer said.

Fischer acknowledged that she has never seen Nebraska farmland as dry as it is now when asked about the on-going drought.

She said she was concerned about federal government overreaching and trying to tell states like Nebraska what to do with its ground and surface water.

When it came to the federal government’s role, it should be limited to a few key priorities such as ensuring national defense, maintaining infrastructure and helping to grow the economy, Fischer said noting “things happen better at the local level.”

Asked about the future of Medicare, Fischer said the commitment to seniors set to retire should be honored but that the current programs might not be there for future generations.

“Medicare and Social Security need to change, things are unsustainable, we need to just be honest with young people,” she said.

In one of the few times she took aim at her opponent, Fischer dispelled any suggestions floated by the Kerrey campaign that she wasn’t willing to debate him when asked about dates for a Senate debate.

“The Kerrey campaign has been disingenuous; I agreed to a debate over a month ago,” Fischer said and listed Aug. 25 at the Nebraska State Fair in Grand Island as a date for the first debate.

She also mentioned that another two debates are in the works but details are yet to be finalized.

When asked what Senate Committees she’d be interested in joining if elected, Fischer listed Agriculture and Armed Services committees as her top two choices but also included the Commerce and Energy committees on her list.

Fischer said she was not supportive of a path to citizenship or incentives for illegal immigrants when asked about her stance on immigration.

“The world has changed since 9-11, we need to know who’s coming in,” Fischer said.

While supporting E-Verify, an Internet based worker verification program, Fischer said she feels all businesses should be required to use it.

“I thought she did an excellent job, touched most of the issues and is extremely well informed,” said State Sen. John Wightman after hearing Fischer’s talk.

When asked if Fischer would get elected, Wightman, refused to give a yes or a no.

“With the Republican registration edge, I’d say she’s the favorite,” he said.
Vice Chairman of the Dawson County GOP Scott Anderson said he thought Deb Fischer was the conservative Nebraska needed in the U.S. Senate.

“She believes in the values of Nebraskan’s and will be the voice we need to help stop the unsustainable spending in Washington,” Anderson said. “She believes in a limited federal government that protects its citizens and provides an environment for private enterprise to thrive and create jobs.”